Importing Fabric Into EQ

My quilts are always designed in EQ and mostly I use fabrics already in the EQ libraries that are similar to the fabrics I intend to use.  Since so much of what I use is tone on tone, it’s real easy to get a close red or a close blue but for the Palette Challenge, some of the colors are so similar that I figured I’d best import the fabrics I intend to use.   If you’ve never imported your own fabrics into your library or sketchbook, it is so easy with EQ7.

I used this photo of all the fabrics together so I didn’t have to photograph each fabric separately.  Call me lazy!  :)

Using your favorite photo editing software (I use either photoshop or paintshop, depending on which computer I’m using), crop out a square of each fabric.

I crop out one, “save as” something like EQ1 and then EQ2 and so on. Name them anything but remember what you’ve named them and if you name them something that falls in consecutive order on your computer, you can simply click once and add them all at once.  I’ll explain thus more when I get to that step.  I don’t keep these files on my computer once they’re imported into my sketchbook.  If you’re saving fabrics you want to keep and use in other projects, set up a folder and name them something that helps you find them for later use.  Once I’ve cropped out one fabric square, I go back to my original picture of the fabric and crop out the next fabric and keep doing this until I have them all cropped and saved to import.

You can also right click many fabric images from the internet and save them and the following steps are exactly the same.

Once your swatches/squares are saved, click on “Library”, then “Fabric Library”, then at the bottom click on “Import” and if you’re adding fabrics you have just photographed, click on “From Image Files”.

Here’s where having them all saved together helps.  Click on the first one and if using a PC, click and hold “Shift + A” and using the arrows, highlight the fabrics you’d like to import.  Macs probably have a similar (and better) function but I use a PC and know nothing about a Mac except my  husband says NO every time I mention getting one.

Once imported, assuming the sketchbook that is open is where you want the fabrics added, click “Add to Sketchbook”.  This is where you can  click to add them to your own library and have them for future uses if desired.

If this is too much to remember, any time  you’re in EQ, click “Help” and then I click “Search” and put in “import fabric” and their instructions come right up.

From start to finish – taking the photo of the fabrics, cropping, importing – all takes less about 3 minutes if you’re familiar with your photo editing program.

 

February Color Palette Possibilities

It’s really difficult for me to use anything but tone on tone fabrics.  I pulled some prints to see if any of those go with this palette.  One is ok . . . not perfect though.

I think I like this fabric so much that I want it to work but there’s too much of that limey yellowy green.  There’s also a lot of blue in the fabric and not in the palette.

This is probably the best match but I only have 1/4 yard of it and since I like to make big quilts, I’m not sure I could make this work.  There’s probably more pink in there than it needs anyway.

This one has plenty of fabric and I have an idea of what I could do with it but the greens aren’t so right.

Today I’m going to try to come up with a quilt design and then I can make the tone on tones work!

Design Wall Monday – February 6, 2012

On my design wall are a some of the components of the blocks that I’m testing for the February QOV pattern.

The bandage on my bum finger isn’t preventing me from doing anything except cleaning house and washing dishes but it surely does slow me down.  I’m going to suffer through it today but tomorrow, I’m calling the doctor’s office and giving them some kind of sob story in hopes of getting a smaller bandage.  If they say no, I have a plan that involves removing this one myself and putting it back on before I go back on the 13th and pretending it’s been on all the time!  :)

OK . . so now you know I’m a terrible patient . . what’s on your design wall?

Rolling Along Part 7

Time to sew the blocks into rows and sew the rows together and then add the borders.

Sew five blocks into rows as shown.  Make 7 rows and sew those together.

For the borders:

#1 – Background fabric.  Strips are cut 1-1/2″.  The side strips should measure 1-1/2″ x 70-1/2″.  The top and bottom borders should measure 1-1/2″ x 52-1/2″.

#2 – Red fabric.  Strips are cut 1-1/2″.  The side strips should measure 1-1/2″ x 72-1/2″.  The top and bottom borders should measure 1-1/2″ x 54-1/2″.

#3 – Navy fabric.  Strips are cut 4″.  The side strips should measure 4″ x 74-1/2″.  The top and bottom borders should measure 4″ x 61-1/2″.

That’s it!

The top should now measure 61″ x 81″.

For the binding, I would cut 9 strips and would probably end up not using much (if any) of the 9th strip but according to my calculations, just a smidgen over 8 strips may be needed and I’d rather have the extra strip than be short.  But . . if you’re going to finish the quilt quickly and bind it right away, you might want to cut 8 strips and then go back and cut the 9th one only if needed.