Biscuits

Every respectable southern girl knows how to make really good biscuits. There are several recipes I like but I wouldn’t say my biscuits are the best I’ve ever had.  I still wish I had the recipe for the biscuits made by Mrs. Morris and served at Kress’ five and dime in Lake Charles in the late 70′s.  Oh, those were the best biscuits ever!  My biscuits will forever be compared to Mrs. Morris’ biscuits except . . I don’t even remember what they tasted like and probably wouldn’t recognize them if I had one again.  That was a long time ago.  Lots of biscuits have been baked (and consumed) in that time frame!

A couple of weeks ago, I saw this book at Amazon.  It’s Southern Biscuits by Nathalie Dupree and Cynthia Graubart.

Southern Biscuits

There are amazing recipes in there, as well as trouble shooting in case your biscuits aren’t perfect.  I kinda wish I hadn’t promised to serve waffles in the morning!  There are recipes for all kinds of biscuits, as well as recipes for using leftover biscuits.  One recipe I can’t wait to try is Overnight Biscuit, Sausage and Apple Casserole.  When we have company, I love making recipes I can leave in the fridge overnight and bake in the morning.  Also, for every day, I need recipes that don’t involve fried eggs and bacon!  There’s also a recipe for Ginger-Banana Biscuit Bread Pudding.  Oh, that sounds yummy!

I also ordered these biscuit cutters.

Biscuit Cutters

What’s really nice is they stack!  And in my tiny kitchen, that helps a lot!

Stacked Biscuit Cutters

I ordered two sets — a book and cutters for me and a book and cutters for Nicole.  She seems to be enjoying cooking a bit more so I’m trying to encourage her with some of the fun things so she learns that cooking doesn’t have to be boring!

Comments

  1. 2

    Cathy Stoddard says

    I agree totally – you are a wonderful mother in law – only I never liked saying “in-law”. I always said “other mother”. Nicole is blessed to have you for her “other mother”.
    You made me buy something again… Can’t wait to get my hands on that biscuit book and cutters!!

  2. 3

    says

    What a sweet MIL you are! I think I’ll have to order this book too. I can’t make a decent biscuit for anything! Hope Amazon has enough for all of us. :)

  3. 4

    says

    I am working on the’best biscuits’ ever too! All of this expermentation with bread recipes is NOT helping my bottom line! :) Tried a new buttermilk-wheat bread the other day. It made the cut. Have another one to try next week. I might need that cookbook!

  4. 5

    says

    I don’t know this book, but have one by Natalie Dupree and love it. Seriously, it must be twenty years old. I’m glad she is still writing.

  5. 6

    lynne quinsland says

    i think i make the best biscuits in the world. my family thinks so too. i use 8 cups of flour (in the recipe) when i make them, so i am making a TON of biscuits that literally disappear. i LOVE a good biscuit with sausage gravy and sure do want to make that sooner rather than later. but biscuits are mostly served with buffalo wings chicken soup around here anymore.

    that book looks beautiful though, and those cutters are to die for! i have my biscuit recipe and i use two different scones recipes–both are from ireland–and it would take something earthmoving for me to even try a different recipe anymore…..

  6. 7

    Jackie says

    Natalie Dupree was in our area earlier is year. Here is a recipe printed the the Sacramento Bee:
    Recipe: Charleston seafood gumbo
    Published: Tuesday, Mar. 26, 2013 – 12:00 am | Page 3D
    Last Modified: Tuesday, Mar. 26, 2013 – 6:44 am
    Serves: 8 to 12

    To demonstrate the flexibility of this recipe, test cook Melody Elliott-Koontz substituted fresh asparagus for some of the okra and added some sliced hot sausage for a spring variation of this classic gumbo from “Mastering the Art of Southern Cooking” (Gibbs Smith, $45, 722 pages) by Nathalie Dupree and Cynthia Graubart.

    INGREDIENTS

    8 tablespoons butter, divided

    4 tablespoons all-purpose flour

    2 medium onions, chopped

    4 cloves garlic, chopped

    8 cups shrimp stock, fish stock, broth or water

    5 fresh tomatoes, peeled, seeded and finely chopped, or 1 can (28 ounces) tomatoes with juice, chopped

    2 pounds okra, fresh or frozen, sliced and divided

    2 pounds fresh fish, cut into 1- or 2-inch pieces

    2 pounds raw shrimp, shells removed

    1 pint shucked raw oysters

    1 pound crabmeat, picked over to remove any shells

    Salt

    Freshly ground black pepper

    Hot sauce, optional

    INSTRUCTIONS

    Melt 6 tablespoons butter in a large Dutch oven. Add the flour and stir until a smooth paste forms, then continue cooking until it is a rich, nutty brown, but not burned, making a dark roux.

    Meanwhile, heat the remaining butter in a small sauté pan. Add the onion and cook until lightly colored. Add the garlic and cook 1 minute more. Add to the brown roux. Stir in the stock or water, tomatoes and half the okra. Bring to a boil, stirring. Reduce heat and cook slowly for 30 minutes, covered. Remove the lid.

    Fifteen minutes before serving, bring back to a boil and add the remaining okra and the fish. Cook a couple of minutes. Add the shrimp and oysters, and cook just until the shrimp turn pink and the edges of the oysters begin to curl.

    Divide the crabmeat among the bowls. Taste the gumbo and season to taste with salt, black pepper and hot sauce as desired. Ladle onto the crabmeat and serve hot.

    Variation: Add chopped ham to the mixture. Add Creole spices and ground hot red pepper to taste.

    © Copyright The Sacramento Bee. All rights reserved.

    Read more here: http://www.sacbee.com/2013/03/26/5291857/recipe-charleston-seafood-gumbo.html#storylink=cpy

  7. 8

    Jackie says

    Natalie Dupree was in our area earlier is year. Here is a recipe printed the the Sacramento Bee:
    Recipe: Charleston seafood gumbo
    Published: Tuesday, Mar. 26, 2013 – 12:00 am | Page 3D
    Last Modified: Tuesday, Mar. 26, 2013 – 6:44 am
    Serves: 8 to 12

    To demonstrate the flexibility of this recipe, test cook Melody Elliott-Koontz substituted fresh asparagus for some of the okra and added some sliced hot sausage for a spring variation of this classic gumbo from “Mastering the Art of Southern Cooking” (Gibbs Smith, $45, 722 pages) by Nathalie Dupree and Cynthia Graubart.

    INGREDIENTS

    8 tablespoons butter, divided

    4 tablespoons all-purpose flour

    2 medium onions, chopped

    4 cloves garlic, chopped

    8 cups shrimp stock, fish stock, broth or water

    5 fresh tomatoes, peeled, seeded and finely chopped, or 1 can (28 ounces) tomatoes with juice, chopped

    2 pounds okra, fresh or frozen, sliced and divided

    2 pounds fresh fish, cut into 1- or 2-inch pieces

    2 pounds raw shrimp, shells removed

    1 pint shucked raw oysters

    1 pound crabmeat, picked over to remove any shells

    Salt

    Freshly ground black pepper

    Hot sauce, optional

    INSTRUCTIONS

    Melt 6 tablespoons butter in a large Dutch oven. Add the flour and stir until a smooth paste forms, then continue cooking until it is a rich, nutty brown, but not burned, making a dark roux.

    Meanwhile, heat the remaining butter in a small sauté pan. Add the onion and cook until lightly colored. Add the garlic and cook 1 minute more. Add to the brown roux. Stir in the stock or water, tomatoes and half the okra. Bring to a boil, stirring. Reduce heat and cook slowly for 30 minutes, covered. Remove the lid.

    Fifteen minutes before serving, bring back to a boil and add the remaining okra and the fish. Cook a couple of minutes. Add the shrimp and oysters, and cook just until the shrimp turn pink and the edges of the oysters begin to curl.

    Divide the crabmeat among the bowls. Taste the gumbo and season to taste with salt, black pepper and hot sauce as desired. Ladle onto the crabmeat and serve hot.

    Variation: Add chopped ham to the mixture. Add Creole spices and ground hot red pepper to taste.

    © Copyright The Sacramento Bee. All rights reserved.

    Read more here: http://www.sacbee.com/2013/03/26/5291857/recipe-charleston-seafood-gumbo.html#storylink=cpy

  8. 9

    AngieG9 says

    Biscuits and gravy every Sunday morning. What a treat. I have my own “recipe” that I learned by watching my mom and both grandmoms, so I couldn’t tell anyone how to make them if they pulled my fingernails out (which is why I keep them short – the fingernails, not the biscuits), and my daughter gets very peeved when she tries to make biscuits because she never watched me make them, and I don’t have a written recipe. I would be afraid I would take the secret to the grave, except my granddaughter learned to make them, so the tradition will live on. I use the same recipe to make dumplings, and my 4 brothers still all line up with forks at the ready to taste test them. I have to make 4 batches before any of them make it to the bowl, and then they still eat like they are starving at the table. Since I don’t throw all of the dumplings in the pot at once and just give them a stir, that’s another thing you have to learn by watching, and I had to watch my grandmother make them because my mom never learned how. I had to teach her years later after grandma died. That’s one that will die with me I’m afraid. No one else wants to take the time to learn.

    • 9.1

      Chris in So Cal says

      Could you get someone to videotape you while you make them?? It might take several times making the recipe but I bet it would be really appreciated. Heck, if you put it on YouTube, I’d watch it. I’d love to learn how to make a good biscuit and good dumplings.

  9. 12

    says

    I almost bought those just now. Then I caught myself. How often do I actually make biscuits? But then, they could be cookie cutters, too, couldn’t they? But how often do I eat cookies?

  10. 13

    Diana says

    Amazon here I come !LOL My grandmother made the best buttermilk biscuit recipe-wish I would of paid more attention back then.
    How nice of you to make sure Nicole gets a book and cutters as well . Good job !!! :-)

  11. 14

    Kathy says

    I have used a number of your recipes, here’s one for you. I grew up in Memphis and my Mother made everything from scratch. I have made a lot of biscuits in my life. My nickname as a kid was “Biscuit” These are the best.
    Mile High Biscuits.
    3 cups flour (Martha White is my favorite, can’t get it in Alaska so I use regular all purpose flour from Costco)
    2 T sugar
    4 1/2 tsp baking powder
    3/4 tsp cream of tartar
    3/4 tsp salt
    3/4 cup shortening (Crisco is all I ever use)
    1 egg, beaten
    1 cup milk
    Sift dry ingredients and cut in shortening with a pastry blender until it resembles coarse meal. Combine egg and milk with a fork. Add all at once, stirring just enough to make a soft dough that sticks together. It will be a little moist. Turn onto floured surface and turn over a couple times until dough is not sticking to the counter. Roll to generous 1 inch thickness. (I like them tall) Cut with floured 2 inch cutter and place on ungreased baking sheet. I put them next to each other for soft sides, but if you like the sides to be crispy, leave an inch in between them. Bake at 450 for 12-15 minutes until golden brown on top. Makes 16.
    We had your seafood and eggplant casserole for supper tonight, that recipe is going in my permanent file!
    Yum.

  12. 15

    says

    Judy, you are a great mother-in-law and I know Nicole appreciates it! But doggone you … I guess I’m gonna have to quit reading your blog. You share all these wonderful things and sometimes I can’t resist getting in on whatever it is you’re doing. Like adding this biscuit book to my Amazon wish list only one day after my doc told me to cut the carbs out of my diet. Hmph. ;-)

  13. 16

    Ruth Anne shorter says

    Thank you all for the two recipes! Also, I envy those of you with “your” good recipes for biscuits. My grandmother made the most wonderful ones that I ate them cold. How I wished I had watched her with her wooden bowl that she used 3 times a day to make grandpa biscuits. Yes they lived a very very long time! In fact the bowl was just put under the sink on a shelf with just a quick wipe. I am sure back then it was lard but I just do not know. I never seem to make them well but I am going to try mile high biscuits!

  14. 17

    Mel Meister says

    I have never understood biscuit cutters. I have always cut my biscuits into squares with a knife and don’t have any waste dough that way. Every so often, I am tempted to buy a set of biscuit cutters but I know that I will never use them!