VitaMix – Whole Wheat Bread

After buying the Vitamix blender, I realized that there is a separate 32 oz. container with a dry blade that will grind wheat and mix the bread in one container.  When I make wheat bread now, I have to get out the wheat grinder, grind the wheat, put it away, get out the Bosch mixer, mix up the bread dough and then put it away.  The whole wheat dough is just too much work for my trusty Kitchen Aid mixer which stays out all the time.

So, I ordered the 32 oz. container with the dry blade.  I was a bit concerned about keeping up with which container was which . .

Containers

Containers

. . til I paid closer attention and realized it’s written right on the container.

Dry Blade

Dry Blade

The container with the dry blade came with a cookbook so I started with one of their recipes but tweaked it a bit.

Wheat in Container

Wheat in Container

I put the wheat in and was anxious to see how well it ground the wheat berries into whole wheat flour.

Flour

Flour

Perfect!  It does produce more heat than does my wheat grinder so I did it on pulse and didn’t let it run continuously but even with pulse, it’s much quicker than my wheat mill.

The dough seemed perfect.

Dough

Dough

It rose nicely.

Ready to Bake

Ready to Bake

And the finished loaf looks good.

Whole Wheat Bread

Whole Wheat Bread

We had it for breakfast this morning and I’m happy to report that it’s my new favorite way to make whole wheat bread.  Everything is done in one container, from grinding the wheat to mixing the ingredients to kneading and even the cleaning is a breeze.  .

This makes a smaller loaf than most recipes and since whole wheat bread is best consumed the same day it is made, or at least by the second day, it’s good that this is a smaller loaf.  By the time we have toast for breakfast and sandwiches at lunch, there’s not much left of this after a second day.  This is so quick since it’s all done in one container, I don’t mind making this bread every other day. I also like that it rises once in the pan.  I am so forgetful that the recipes that have to rise in the bowl, then rise again in the container, sometimes get forgotten about on my counter.

The 750 model, and probably other models as well, has the “clean” feature.  I squirt a drop or two of soap in there, add water, turn on the “clean” cycle.

Cleaning

Cleaning

I dump out steaming hot soap water, rinse and it is perfectly clean . . even from that sticky whole wheat bread dough.

Here’s my version of the Vitamix recipe.

Whole Wheat, Oat and Flax Seed Bread

1 cup warm water
2 T. honey or molasses
1 packet active dry yeast (or 2-1/4 teaspoons yeast)
2 T. rolled oats (not instant)
2 T. flax seed
3/4 cup wheat berries (or 1 cup whole wheat flour)
1-1/4 cup bread flour
1/4 cup non-fat dry milk
1 tsp. dough enhancer
1 tsp. vital wheat gluten
1 tsp. salt
2 T. olive oil

Directions:

1.  Mix warm water, yeast and honey or molasses and allow yeast to proof.  Set aside.

2.  Add wheat berries, oats and flax seeds to the container.  Select variable 1 and slowly turn up to #10.  Grind for 30 seconds.  Pulse several more times until the flour is the consistency desired.

3.  Add the flour, salt, dry milk, dough enhancer and gluten.  Pulse til blended well.

4.  Add yeast mixture and olive oil.  Blend on high several times, stopping and starting until ingredients are mixed and kneaded a bit.  Scrape down the sides with an oiled rubber spatula.  Continue the off/on procedure until dough is soft an elastic.

5.  Because I love to hand knead dough, I dumped mine out (actually dug it out . . it gets pretty stuck under those blades) and kneaded it on an oiled plastic pastry mat, with my hands oiled also.

6.  Shape into a loaf and place into an oiled 8″ x 4″ pan (this is smaller than most bread pans).

7.  Cover with oiled plastic wrap and let rise for about half an hour.

8.  Bake at 375º for about 30 minutes.  Cool on a wire rack and enjoy!

Every time I use this blender, I ask myself “Why did you wait so long?”

Back to Square One – Clue #9

We’re zipping right along here.  September already!

For this month, we’ll be making more log cabin blocks and adding a plain border.  There are two steps .. don’t stop after making the log cabins.

September Block

September Block

These will be 8″ finished or 8-1/2″ unfinished.  These are almost exactly like what we did in July but those were smaller.   You will again make 24 blocks.

Piecing Diagram

 

Please refer to the July instructions if you need help with the piecing.

Fabric 1:  Cut one of each:

  • 1-1/2″ x 2-1/2″ rectangle (G)
  • 1-1/2″ x 3-1/2″ rectangle (F)
  • 1-1/2″ x 4-1/2″ rectangle (E)
  • 1-1/2″ x 5-1/2″ rectangle (D)
  • 1-1/2″ x 6-1/2″ rectangle (B)
  • 1-1/2″ x 7-1/2″ rectangle (A)

Fabric 2:  1-1/2″ x 3-1/2″ rectangle (F) and 1-1/2″ x 4-1/2″ rectangle (E)

Fabric 3: 1-1/2″ x 5-1/2″ rectangle (D) and 1-1/2″ x 6-1/2″ rectangle (B)

Fabric 5: 1-1/2″ x 7-1/2″ rectangle (A) and 1-1/2″ x 8-1/2″ rectangle (C)

Fabric 6: 1 – 2-1/2″ square (H)

For the second part of this month’s clue, we’ll be adding Border #2.  Use Fabric 2.  These are the cutting measurements:

Sides – 2-1/2″ x 60-1/2″
Top & Bottom – 2-1/2″ x 64-1/2″

Your top should now look like this and should measure 64-1/2″ x 64-1/2″.

September

September

 

If you’re up to date through the August clue, please share a picture.  On Wednesday, I will draw for the winner . . who will receive a Stash Pack from Vicki Welsh’s Etsy Shop.  When you need (or want) hand dyed fabric, please remember Vicki . . who sponsors this Mystery.